This Day in History

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Today is Tuesday, Sept. 7, the 250th day of 2021. There are 115 days left in the year.

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Construction progresses rapidly on Wheeler Dam on the Tennessee River, near the city of Florence, Ala., Nov. 14, 1934. All of the operations being conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority will be visited by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during his projected trip through the south. The p…

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The sights of Broadway are pointed out to some of the Grand Ole Opry troupe outside the Palace Theatre in New York City, November 2, 1955. From left are Irving Berger, manager of the Palace; Roy Acuff; Ruby Wells; Kitty Wells; Johnnie Wright; and Jack Anglin.

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A swan takes a swim in the park, after the River Avon in Stratford upon Avon burst it’s banks Wednesday Nov. 1, 2000. Many areas of Britain are under emergency flood warnings after storms, heavy rain and winds have left a trail of devastation over large areas of the country.

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Anti-nuclear demonstrators in Halloween masks hold up vivid placards in front of the New York Stock Exchange, Oct. 29, 1979. More than 1,000 demonstrators, accompanied by a brass band playing circus music, tried in vain to close the Stock Exchange on the 50th anniversary of the 1929 stock market crash.

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A truck carries a load of beer kegs in a beer parade and demonstration held in Newark, N.J., Oct. 28, 1932. More than 20,000 people took part in the mass demand for repeal of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution.

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Willie Nelson, shown in this file photo from Oct. 22, 1998, won the “Vote Don’t Mess With Texas” contest, a promotion to further the state’s anti-litter campaign. Voters selected Nelson as the state’s favorite spokesperson in the 12-year aim to reduce roadside litter.

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From left are Francis Jehl, President Herbert Hoover, Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, seated, at the 50th anniversary of the incandescent light at Greenfield Village, Michigan, Oct. 21, 1929. Edison is showing the president how he made the first lamp.

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The wreckage of a twin engine Convair 240 plane lies in a wooded area near McComb, Miss., on Oct. 20, 1977. The small plane had 26 people on board, and six were killed in the crash, including three members of The Lynyrd Skynyrd Band.

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Actor Joe Pesci lines up a putt at the VH1 Fairway to Heaven Golf Tournament for the Save the Music Foundation at the Las Vegas Country Club in Las Vegas, Nev., Monday, Oct. 18, 1999.

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Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, the historic honky-tonk where Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson and other stars used to come when they were trying to make a name for themselves, is shown Friday, Oct. 15, 1999. The famous watering hole with the purple paint now shares the street with newcomers like the Hard Rock Cafe, Planet Hollywood and the NASCAR Cafe.

Opposing managers Connie Mack, right, and John McGraw, at the opening game of the 1911 World Series, New York City, October 14, 1911. Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics defeated McGraw’s New York Giants, 4 games to 2 to take the series.

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Danish personnel suffering from influenza occupy beds in temporary sick quarters set up in a gymnasium at Copenhagen’s naval shipyard to handle the large amount of patients on Oct. 12, 1957. On Wednesday, April 13, 2005, scientists around the world were scrambling to prevent the possibility of a pandemic after a nearly 50-year-old killer influenza virus was sent to thousands of labs, a decision that one researcher described as “unwise.”

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Boston Celtics legendary center Bill Russell has a light moment while answering questions from members of the media after a Celtics team practice in Waltham, Mass., Monday, Oct. 11, 1999. The Hall-of-Famer is working with the team on Monday and Tuesday, and will return to the team periodically to monitor, teach, and develop the players.

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Rebecca Latimer Felton of Cartersvill, Ga., the first woman U.S. Senator, is shown Oct. 7, 1922 strumming a guitar. She was appointed this week to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late Sen. T. E. Watson. She is 87 years old.

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Young surfers seeking a new thrill ride toward the beach on miniboards, the foam plastic and fiberglass surfboards now popular at Redondo Beach, Calif., and other sandy beaches with waves breaking close to shore, Oct. 6, 1969. The move with the slightest shift of the rider’s weight, enabling him to dart high and low and sideways like a hummingbird.

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Country and western singer Johnny Cash, center, is flanked by a bondsman and a U.S. Marshall as he is transferred from El Paso County Jail to the federal courthouse in El Paso, Texas, Oct. 5, 1965. Cash was arrested at the International Airport Monday and charged with importing and concealing over 1,000 pep pills and tranquilizers. Bond was $1,500.

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Singer John Fogerty poses with his newly-unveiled star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Thursday, Oct. 1, 1998 in Los Angeles. Fogerty, the founder of Creedence Clearwater Revival, was honored for his enduring contributions to the American musical scene over more than three decades.

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Each Throwback Thursday the Citizen Tribune shares a photo from the formative years of the G.I. Generation. Born from 1901 to 1926, the G.I. Generation is also known as the Greatest Generation that won World War II. The core values of the G.I. Generation were leading honorably and dreaming big.

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Each Wednesday the Citizen Tribune shares a photo from the formative years of the Boomer Generation. Born from 1946 to 1964, the Boomer Generation was created when the members of the G.I. Generation returned from World War II. There were 79,907,844 Boomer Generation children born. The format…

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Each Tuesday the Citizen Tribune shares a photo from the formative years of the Silent Generation. Born from 1927 to 1945, the Silent Generation is sandwiched between the G.I. Generation and the Boomer Generation.

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