Is the Trump-Churchill comparison fair?

Left-wing critics of President Donald Trump take offense at The Colorado Springs Gazette, which compared him to former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. One left-leaning publication called the Gazette’s words “inadvisable,” “unfathomable” and possibly “offensive.”

According to the Gazette, they used the comparison to show how Trump is not the first successful world leader with a crude mouth and crass personality.

In a similar fashion to The Gazette’s Trump endorsement, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette endorsed the president while decrying his personality quirks. They, too, mentioned Churchill but not to compare him to Trump. Instead, the endorsement included Churchill among world leaders with a “first-class temperament and demeanor.”

If that’s Churchill’s legacy 55 years past his death, we can expect history to likewise view Trump as a gentleman only two-to-three generations in the future.

In the context of personality, the major distinctions between Churchill and Trump are alcohol and Twitter. Churchill drank whiskey morning, noon, and night but had no access to social media. Trump tweets morning, noon, and night but has never drunk booze.

Trump has no use for subtlety and talks without a filter. He could have taken that lead from Churchill, who openly advocated confrontational words.

“If you have an important point to make, don’t try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time — a tremendous whack,” Churchill advised his fans.

Trump, like Churchill, brands his contemporaries with direct, simple, and repetitive themes. “Sleepy Joe Biden.” “Crooked Hillary.” “Mini Mike.”

Churchill called former British Prime Minister David Lloyd George “The Chattering Little Cad.” Indian civil rights leader Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was “The Half-naked Fakir.” Labour Prime Minister James MacDonald was “The Boneless Wonder.” The list goes on.

“I wish Stanley Baldwin no ill, but it would have been much better if he had never lived,” Churchill said on the former prime minister’s 80th birthday.

Should Gandhi die of his hunger strike in jail, Churchill said, “we should be rid of a bad man and an enemy of the Empire.”

Trump has a history of insulting the looks of his female critics. He called an adult film star “horse face.” Of former presidential candidate Carly Fiorina, he said “look at that face! Would anyone vote for that?”

Churchill promoted himself as an all-day drinker and reveled in his public image as a functional alcoholic. When Parliamentary member Bessie Braddock called him out for drunken behavior late at night in 1946, Parliamentary bodyguard Ronald Golding told of Churchill delivering folklore’s most beloved insult.

“Bessie, my dear, you are ugly, and what’s more, you are disgustingly ugly. By tomorrow I shall be sober and you will still be disgustingly ugly,” Churchill reportedly said, in a famous comment often repeated with slight variations.

In the style of Churchill, Trump serves as a bold and unapologetic defender of western civilization and an enemy of oppressive regimes. Churchill won the Nobel Prize for oratory “defending exalted human values.” Legislators in Norway and Sweden, along with four Australian law professors, have nominated Trump to receive the Nobel Prize for his doctrine of maintaining peace among nations through negotiations and limited intervention by the U.S. military.

Ivanka Trump took to a campaign rally stage a few days later and compared her father to Churchill.

“Winston Churchill said, ‘It was the nation that had the lion’s heart, I just had the luck to give it the roar.’ How much does this remind you of our president and this movement?” Ivanka Trump said.

As the left apologizes for this country — promising an economy, government, and culture based on Marxist ideology — Trump boldly promotes an “America First” agenda that defends American exceptionalism.

Indeed, Trump is this century’s politician most reminiscent of the crude, direct, and fiercely patriotic Winston Churchill — a man who emboldened his country to fight for what was right.

-The Colorado Springs Gazette