Greatest Generation Throwback Thursday

The German dirigible Hindenburg crashes to earth, tail first, in flaming ruins after exploding on May 6, 1937, at the U.S. Naval Station in Lakehurst, N.J. The 1920s and 1930s were the golden age of dirigibles which crossed the Atlantic Ocean in about three days -- faster than a ship. The Hindenburg was the largest airship ever built at 804 feet long and flew up to 85 miles per hour while held aloft by hydrogen, which was highly flammable. The disaster, which killed 36 people after a 60-hour transatlantic flight from Germany, ended regular passenger service by the lighter-than-air airships. (AP Photo/Murray Becker)

Each Throwback Thursday the Citizen Tribune shares a photo from the formative years of the G.I. Generation. Born from 1901 to 1926, the G.I. Generation is also known as the Greatest Generation that won World War II. The core values of the G.I. Generation were leading honorably and dreaming big. The G.I. Generation was molded by the first World War, the Roaring ’20s and a time of massive growth, expansion and technological wonders. They were ordinary Americans who accomplished extraordinary things and oversaw growth that built the most powerful middle class in the nation’s history. The leaders of the G.I. Generation believed in character, togetherness, humility and compassion.