This morning, as happened yesterday, there were scenes of packed peak-hour Tubes, trains and buses. This makes a mockery of advice to keep at least two metres apart to limit the risk of infection.

Passengers are right to be angry that they are being put at risk. Transport staff fear for their safety too. This can’t go on. The Government, the Mayor and transport bosses need a better plan.

While millions of people are working from home — or, for a time, not able to work at all — huge numbers of us still need to travel. That doesn’t just mean NHS staff or teachers keeping schools open for key workers, but everyone who keeps our city fed, safe and functioning — from engineers who make sure our broadband works to delivery drivers who bring food and fill the supermarket shelves.

They need to travel, and they have a right to do so in safety.

Last week transport bosses prepared a plan which saw some Tube stations close altogether and which cut back the frequency of services. For most of the day, this plan works. Overall demand on the Tube has fallen by 85 per cent this week.

But it’s not enough to cope with the pressure of peak travel so far in the morning. National rail services, running less often, are also crowded in places.

The obvious thing to do would be to roll back some of the cuts. But there’s a problem. Already around 750 Tube drivers are self-isolating, and as the coronavirus crisis grows, staff shortages will grow too.

London’s transport bosses say they can’t run more trains and they want to make sure they have staff to keep lines open.

We understand the challenge but in the next few days more frequent services are necessary.

What matters most is that only essential workers travel. But what counts as essential?

Many building sites remain open, and it is impossible for people on them to work remotely. Around half of London’s construction workers are self-employed and, without any other reliable income, will keep coming to work.

The pressure of numbers is causing overcrowding. One answer would be to shut construction sites.

It might come to that, but there should be no reason why, when run properly, work cannot continue at a reduced level. Construction firms should stagger their start times so not all their workers have to come in at once.

They could also limit the amount of work being done on sites.

We need a plan for this, fast. The order from the Prime Minister is clear and it is right — travel only for essential reasons and keep apart when you do.

If your journey isn’t essential, stay off the Underground.

-The London Evening StandardThis morning, as happened yesterday, there were scenes of packed peak-hour Tubes, trains and buses. This makes a mockery of advice to keep at least two metres apart to limit the risk of infection.

Passengers are right to be angry that they are being put at risk. Transport staff fear for their safety too. This can’t go on. The Government, the Mayor and transport bosses need a better plan.

While millions of people are working from home — or, for a time, not able to work at all — huge numbers of us still need to travel. That doesn’t just mean NHS staff or teachers keeping schools open for key workers, but everyone who keeps our city fed, safe and functioning — from engineers who make sure our broadband works to delivery drivers who bring food and fill the supermarket shelves.

They need to travel, and they have a right to do so in safety.

Last week transport bosses prepared a plan which saw some Tube stations close altogether and which cut back the frequency of services. For most of the day, this plan works. Overall demand on the Tube has fallen by 85 per cent this week.

But it’s not enough to cope with the pressure of peak travel so far in the morning. National rail services, running less often, are also crowded in places.

The obvious thing to do would be to roll back some of the cuts. But there’s a problem. Already around 750 Tube drivers are self-isolating, and as the coronavirus crisis grows, staff shortages will grow too.

London’s transport bosses say they can’t run more trains and they want to make sure they have staff to keep lines open.

We understand the challenge but in the next few days more frequent services are necessary.

What matters most is that only essential workers travel. But what counts as essential?

Many building sites remain open, and it is impossible for people on them to work remotely. Around half of London’s construction workers are self-employed and, without any other reliable income, will keep coming to work.

The pressure of numbers is causing overcrowding. One answer would be to shut construction sites.

It might come to that, but there should be no reason why, when run properly, work cannot continue at a reduced level. Construction firms should stagger their start times so not all their workers have to come in at once.

They could also limit the amount of work being done on sites.

We need a plan for this, fast. The order from the Prime Minister is clear and it is right — travel only for essential reasons and keep apart when you do.

If your journey isn’t essential, stay off the Underground.

-The London Evening Standard