Additional Headlines

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Sherrie Montgomery, director of the Hamblen County Health Department, said the health department currently has enough vaccines to last until Friday, and is not taking appointments past that point.

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Several of the counties in the Tennessee Department of Health’s Northeast Region, which includes Hawkins, Greene and Hancock counties, have progressed to the next phase of vaccinations and are vaccinating teachers and school staff.

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Amid a rise in local novel coronavirus (COVID-19) cases, Morristown-Hamblen Healthcare System is announcing an updated visitation policy, instructions for patients coming to the emergency department who are exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms, and what to do if you are experiencing any related symptoms.

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The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services expanded the state’s Behavioral Health Safety Net program to include uninsured children. The McNabb Center is partnering with the state on this initiative.

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The Cocke County Health Department is offering flu vaccine at no charge to the community during a special FightFluTN vaccination event on Tuesday, Nov. 19.

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Tom Strate, left, April Parrigin, Brandi Lane and Christine Gosser are “all in” for the 2019 United Way of Hamblen County campaign. Strate Insurance is serving as a Pacesetter company, and is currently conducting preliminary fundraising to assist with raising the division’s goal of $75,000 b…

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Two residents of Life Care Center in Morristown have been named by the Tennessee Health Care Association to its annual Who’s Who in Tennessee Long-term Care.

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More than 150 students entered this year’s Be Smart, Don’t Smart #tobaccofreehs art contest. Juliana Flores Martinez, a junior at Morristown-Hamblen High School East was named winner of the contest with her drawing of damaged lungs. She was given a $100 check from the Hamblen County Health D…

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KNOXVILLE – Research shows that one in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. African-American men are more likely to get prostate cancer and twice as likely to die from the disease than their Caucasian counterparts—and no o…