Hale Springs Inn

Hale Springs Inn – Historical places, Rogersville, Tenn.

Hale Springs in dinning room

Hale Springs Inn

For the longest time it seemed that the dream of restoring the Hale Springs Inn to its former glory was just that. From the time the inn closed for business in 1998, there were always hopes that Rogersville’s crown jewel would reopen its doors and welcome visitors from all over the country to enjoy the quiet elegance of the historic inn.

 

Mollie Grey Room

Mollie Gray Room

 

“Miss Mollie” was the last of four generations to occupy Rosemont. After the Rosemont sale, she moved into a suite at the Hale Springs Inn and lived there until her death. Miss Mollie’s corner cupboard, which she inherited through her Stamps family connection, was donated to the Hale Springs Inn.

 

President James K. Polk Suite

President James K. Polk Suite

On July 29, 1839, James K. Polk, who had served in the U.S. Congress from 1825 to 1839, visited Rogersville during his campaign for Governor of Tennessee. A big celebration was hosted by Mayor Dicks Alexander and the Town Council. Polk spent the night at McKinney’s Tavern (now the Hale Springs Inn) before going on to Rutledge on July 30 and to Tazewell on the 31st.

Carl and Janet Netherland-Brown Room

Carl and Janet Netherland-Brown Room

Carl Netherland-Brown was born in McMinn County, Tennessee but grew up in Miami where he began a career as a sailor at age 16. Carl purchased the inn in 1982. At age 29,he was named Captain of the cruise ship S/S Bahama Star – the youngest man to ever hold such a position in the history of the Eastern Steamship Line.

 

President Andrew Jackson Suite

President Andrew Jackson Suite

Named for the 7th president of the United States. Tradition is that Jackson spent the night at the Rogers Tavern as well as the Hale Springs Inn, and while at the Tavern one night, Mary Amis Rogers was being given a “hard time” by another traveler who arrived after the house was full. The story goes that Jackson told the unruly traveler that he would show him to a private room—whereupon he took him behind the tavern to the corn crib and locked him in for the night.