Fishman earns Good Scout Award

Posted on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 11:38 am

2014 Friends of Scouting Chair Andy Smith (CEO of Jefferson Federal Bank) presented Lakeway Publishers President R. Jack Fishman with the Hamblen County Good Scout Award during this morning’s annual Boy Scouts of America Breakfast. At right is WSCC President Emeritus Jack Campbell.

2014 Friends of Scouting Chair Andy Smith (CEO of Jefferson Federal Bank) presented Lakeway Publishers President R. Jack Fishman with the Hamblen County Good Scout Award during this morning’s annual Boy Scouts of America Breakfast. At right is WSCC President Emeritus Jack Campbell.

Upon introducing the recipient of this year’s Hamblen County Good Scout Award, Walters State President Emeritus Jack Campbell said to be successful in life you have to continuously generate new ideas.

By the long list of accomplishments attached to honoree Lakeway Publishers Inc. President R. Jack Fishman, Campbell was accurate in saying Fishman aptly fits that definition of success.

Fishman was honored during this morning’s annual Hamblen County Good Scout Breakfast at Rose Center’s Prater Hall with the Boy Scouts of America Cherokee District.

Campbell said Fishman’s impact on the community has gone beyond his professional accomplishments, which include founding the Citizen Tribune, serving on multiple state and national newspaper industry boards, including the Associated Press board.

Campbell pointed to Fishman’s decades-long service on the Morristown Industrial Development board and his service leadership boards for non-profit organizations in the community such as the Boy Scouts of America.

Campbell said Fishman has a heart for his community and its young people.

Accepting the award, Fishman shared a sentiment from Peanuts Cartoonist Charles M. Schulz.

Fishman rhetorically asked if anyone could remember the last five winners of the Heisman trophy or the Pulitzer and Nobel prizes. Then he asked who could remember a few teachers who aided them through school or five people that make them feel appreciated.

Fishman said while prize winners are among the best in their field, yesterday’s headlines are not long remembered.

“The people that make a difference in life are the ones who care the most,” Fishman said.

Fishman said he would be remiss if he did not mention some of the former recipients of the Good Scout Award like Jack Strate, William “Doc” Rooney, Gene Smith and many others who served countless hours of time to youth for the betterment of the community.

“The values of the Boy Scouts are just as relevant today to help youth as they were more than 100 years ago,” he said. “Scout leaders help develop academic skills, self confidence and ethics. Scouting encourages us to achieve a deeper appreciation of service within our community. Peer pressure can be resisted and right choices for our community and nation can be made.

“What a world of difference it would make if we could reach the goal and dream to prepare every individual youth in America to become a responsible, participating citizen guided by the scout oath and laws,” he said.

Fishman said he remembered an editorial written in the Citizen Tribune 37 years ago which said how well we train the youth to play the game of life may well determine the future of not only our community but the nation and the world.

“The enrichment of their lives, the morals, ethics and values including fair play and good sportsmanship forms the very cornerstone of our heritage in America for years to come. I still believe this is just as relevant today as it was then,” he said.

Looking at the scout brochure that stated Tennessee was ranked 45thin the nation in education and 26 percent of area children live in poverty, Fishman told the audience that enough hasn’t been done.

He closed in saying time is something that should never be wasted.

“We have the opportunity to make a difference in the way our youth spend their time and hopefully make their time more valuable and worthwhile. Remember, it’s the time that you spend … use it to lift up, to teach and help others. Show that you care,” Fishman said.

The breakfast also served as a campaign fundraiser for the Cherokee District, which has a yearly goal of raising $73,000 that is used directly by troops within the district.

Cherokee District Chair Tom Strate announced the breakfast raised $22,075, which will raise funds already collected to $61,000.

For more information on the benefits of scouting or how to become involved, visit www.bsa-gsmc.org.

-By Chris Phipps, Tribune Staff Writer

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